thebrainscoop:

wedoscience:

Students at the Field Museum showing off the myrmecological diversity of the museum’s insect collections.
Photo by James Waters.

This. Blog. Is. Fantastic. 
I’m pretty vocal about my personal feelings in regards to how scientists themselves are presented and represented, not only in the media but also to students and one another.
When I was at Science Online last month I spoke to many people from a variety of backgrounds and we shared stories - sometimes painfully awkward stories - on how we’re approached to participate in print or media interviews. One chemist shared with me how she’s frequently asked to put on a white lab coat - even when the interview is in her office - and that once they get to her lab she’s asked to mix up vials of brightly-colored liquids, or create smoking beakers, in order to fulfill this misrepresentation we’ve created of what a chemist looks like.
While I totally understand there is a time and place for lab safety and that such wardrobe is often times required to fulfill those protocols, more often than not we’re perpetuating a stereotype which is largely unrealistic. A Google image search of the word “scientist”  results in rows and rows of white people in lab coats, mostly men, inappropriately holding pipettes or peering into those beakers with unnaturally colored liquids.
If we can’t relate to that image - if we’re not white, or men, or aspiring to peer at unnaturally colored liquids in beakers - then we can’t hope to diversify our own field. That image is a barrier and exists as another point of inaccessibility to what is inherently natural to all of us, and that is a general inquisitiveness about our world. 
Follow this blog. Submit an image of your own. Let’s change the face of science. 

GABE! YOURE ON THE BRAIN SCOOP!

thebrainscoop:

wedoscience:

Students at the Field Museum showing off the myrmecological diversity of the museum’s insect collections.

Photo by James Waters.

This. Blog. Is. Fantastic. 

I’m pretty vocal about my personal feelings in regards to how scientists themselves are presented and represented, not only in the media but also to students and one another.

When I was at Science Online last month I spoke to many people from a variety of backgrounds and we shared stories - sometimes painfully awkward stories - on how we’re approached to participate in print or media interviews. One chemist shared with me how she’s frequently asked to put on a white lab coat - even when the interview is in her office - and that once they get to her lab she’s asked to mix up vials of brightly-colored liquids, or create smoking beakers, in order to fulfill this misrepresentation we’ve created of what a chemist looks like.

While I totally understand there is a time and place for lab safety and that such wardrobe is often times required to fulfill those protocols, more often than not we’re perpetuating a stereotype which is largely unrealistic. A Google image search of the word “scientist”  results in rows and rows of white people in lab coats, mostly men, inappropriately holding pipettes or peering into those beakers with unnaturally colored liquids.

If we can’t relate to that image - if we’re not white, or men, or aspiring to peer at unnaturally colored liquids in beakers - then we can’t hope to diversify our own field. That image is a barrier and exists as another point of inaccessibility to what is inherently natural to all of us, and that is a general inquisitiveness about our world. 

Follow this blog. Submit an image of your own. Let’s change the face of science. 

GABE! YOURE ON THE BRAIN SCOOP!

tibets:

this is the 2nd time i’m reblogging this today because i laughed just as hard  as i did the 1st time i saw it

tibets:

this is the 2nd time i’m reblogging this today because i laughed just as hard  as i did the 1st time i saw it